Lootere Bandits Of British India Season 2

Wed & Thur at 10.30pm
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Lootere Bandits Of British India Season 2

Show Schedule
Wed & Thur at 10.30pm
Repeat Show

Sun 9.30pm

Thur & Fri - 10.30am & 2.30pm

British India, especially in the early 19th Century, had witnessed an unprecedented upsurge in organised crime by communities and tribes as diverse as Thuggees and Pindharis, Bheels and Budhuks. These groups, active across the length and breadth of the country, looted, plundered, killed and terrorised the lay populace. The British cracked down heavily on these communities. In an organised manner they assigned themselves necessary freedom and sweeping powers by passing various laws and acts such as ‘Thuggee and Dacoity Suppression Acts’ [1836–1848] specifically aimed at elimination of Thuggees and Dacoits and ‘Criminal Tribes Act’ [1871] meant to eventually reign in about one hundred and fifty tribal communities which were believed to be hereditary criminals and officially notified as criminal groups. They even declared wars on such communities, the most famous being ‘Pindari War’ [1817-‘18] at the end of which Pindaris were completely subjugated. It was only the dedicated and concerted effort of the British power which could eventually liberate the masses from the terror and grip of those communities. Or so is the mainstream belief, coming from the history written by the British. But there is a growing acceptance of a revisionist view which explains the rise of such communities primarily as a revolt of the ordinary people against the British as well as the pro-establishment Indian class which exploited them in tandem with the British. As in the case of Thuggees, an incredible exaggeration of the size of the group and their acts, turning random, similar but non-connected acts of diverse criminals, their numbers running at best into a few hundreds, into a fictional, demonic, criminal cult with thousands of members and lakhs of victims. All done in order to instil tremendous fear in the mind of the locals as well as to appropriate sweeping powers to crack down on any native they suspected of subversion and anti British activity, by branding him a Thug. Furthermore, most of these communities and their leaders shared a ‘healthy’ relationship with the ruling class. There was a clear nexus between law-breakers and supposed guardians of law. Whether it was Thuggees and the patronage they received from the local zamindars and chieftains or Pindaris and Maratha chiefs like Scindias and Holkars or even the Dacoit chiefs and ruling princes. Something which clearly resonates even in modern times! Season 2 of Lootere, looks at these communities and concepts, their history and present day status to analyse the truth behind the stories told to us by British historians and to understand the larger socio-economic-political reality of that time. The series also draws inferences where the lines between the lawless and legitimate powers are blurred, where criminals are politicians and politicians are criminals and the nexus between the criminal, political and business class is deep rooted, where the locals revolting against the establishment, for reasons right or wrong, are promptly branded as Terrorists, Naxalites or Maoists and where the truth is neither black or white.

  • Episode 1 - Sultana Daku

    Sultana Daku was a dacoit in the 1920’s British India....read more

  • Episode 2 - Sultana Daku Part II

    Sultana Daku was a terror in Bijnor area and earned his name as a dacoit by looting people of repute....read more

  • Episode 3 - Chapparbands 1

    Discover the dual life of the Chapparbands who hailed from the Bombay Presidency and were the manufacturers of spurious coins....read more

Show Detail (Mobile)

About Show

British India, especially in the early 19th Century, had witnessed an unprecedented upsurge in organised crime by communities and tribes as diverse as Thuggees and Pindharis, Bheels and Budhuks. These groups, active across the length and breadth of the country, looted, plundered, killed and terrorised the lay populace. The British cracked down heavily on these communities. In an organised manner they assigned themselves necessary freedom and sweeping powers by passing various laws and acts such as ‘Thuggee and Dacoity Suppression Acts’ [1836–1848] specifically aimed at elimination of Thuggees and Dacoits and ‘Criminal Tribes Act’ [1871] meant to eventually reign in about one hundred and fifty tribal communities which were believed to be hereditary criminals and officially notified as criminal groups. They even declared wars on such communities, the most famous being ‘Pindari War’ [1817-‘18] at the end of which Pindaris were completely subjugated. It was only the dedicated and concerted effort of the British power which could eventually liberate the masses from the terror and grip of those communities. Or so is the mainstream belief, coming from the history written by the British. But there is a growing acceptance of a revisionist view which explains the rise of such communities primarily as a revolt of the ordinary people against the British as well as the pro-establishment Indian class which exploited them in tandem with the British. As in the case of Thuggees, an incredible exaggeration of the size of the group and their acts, turning random, similar but non-connected acts of diverse criminals, their numbers running at best into a few hundreds, into a fictional, demonic, criminal cult with thousands of members and lakhs of victims. All done in order to instil tremendous fear in the mind of the locals as well as to appropriate sweeping powers to crack down on any native they suspected of subversion and anti British activity, by branding him a Thug. Furthermore, most of these communities and their leaders shared a ‘healthy’ relationship with the ruling class. There was a clear nexus between law-breakers and supposed guardians of law. Whether it was Thuggees and the patronage they received from the local zamindars and chieftains or Pindaris and Maratha chiefs like Scindias and Holkars or even the Dacoit chiefs and ruling princes. Something which clearly resonates even in modern times! Season 2 of Lootere, looks at these communities and concepts, their history and present day status to analyse the truth behind the stories told to us by British historians and to understand the larger socio-economic-political reality of that time. The series also draws inferences where the lines between the lawless and legitimate powers are blurred, where criminals are politicians and politicians are criminals and the nexus between the criminal, political and business class is deep rooted, where the locals revolting against the establishment, for reasons right or wrong, are promptly branded as Terrorists, Naxalites or Maoists and where the truth is neither black or white.

Episode Guide

  • Episode 1 - Sultana Daku

    Sultana Daku was a dacoit in the 1920’s British India....read more

  • Episode 2 - Sultana Daku Part II

    Sultana Daku was a terror in Bijnor area and earned his name as a dacoit by looting people of repute....read more

  • Episode 3 - Chapparbands 1

    Discover the dual life of the Chapparbands who hailed from the Bombay Presidency and were the manufacturers of spurious coins....read more